Tax tips to know before filing your 2023 income tax

This year’s tax deadline is April 30, 2024. It’s important to make sure you’re claiming all the credits and deductions you’re eligible for. We’ve separated this article into 2 sections: 

  • What’s new for 2023

  • Individuals and Families

What’s New for 2023

Advanced Canada Workers Benefit (ACWB)

Automatic advance payments of the Canada Workers Benefit (CWB) are now seamlessly distributed through the ACWB program to individuals who received the benefit in the last tax year. However, it’s important to note that not everyone who received the CWB in the previous tax year will automatically receive the ACWB payments. Only individuals who filed their 2022 tax return before November 1, 2023, are eligible for the ACWB payments.

Furthermore, it’s worth mentioning that the ACWB program eliminates the need to file Form RC201. Recipients are no longer required to fill out this form. Instead, starting in 2023, individuals should report the amounts from their RC210 slip on Schedule 6, Canada Workers Benefit, of their tax return. Additionally, for eligible spouses, the option to claim the basic amount for the CWB is available regardless of who received the RC210 slip.

Deduction for Tools (Tradespersons and Apprentice Mechanics)

Starting in 2023, the maximum employment deduction for eligible tools of tradespersons has risen from $500 to $1,000. Consequently, the threshold for expenses eligible for the apprentice mechanics tools deduction has also been adjusted. 

Temporary Flat Rate Method for Home Office Expenses

For the year 2023, the temporary flat rate method for claiming home office expenses is not applicable. Consequently, taxpayers seeking to claim such expenses for 2023 must utilize the detailed method and obtain a completed Form T2200, Declaration of Conditions of Employment, from their employer.

Federal, Provincial, and Territorial COVID-19 repayments

Repayments of COVID-19 benefits at the federal, provincial, and territorial levels, made after December 31, 2022, can be deducted and claimed.

First Home Savings Account (FHSA)

The FHSA is a registered plan designed to aid individuals in saving for their first home. Starting April 1, 2023, contributions made to an FHSA are typically deductible, and eligible withdrawals made from an FHSA for purchasing a qualifying home are tax-free. 

Property Flipping

Starting January 1, 2023, any profit generated from the sale of a housing unit (including rental properties) situated in Canada, or a right to acquire a housing unit in Canada, that you owned or held for less than 365 consecutive days prior to its sale is considered business income rather than a capital gain. This is applicable unless the property was already classified as inventory or the sale occurred due to, or in anticipation of specific life events. 

Multigenerational Home Renovation Tax Credit (MHRTC)

The MHRTC is a refundable tax credit designed to enable eligible individuals to seek reimbursement for specific renovation expenses incurred in establishing a secondary unit within an eligible dwelling. This enables a qualifying individual to live with their qualifying relative. If eligible, you can claim up to $50,000 in qualifying expenditures for each renovation project completed, with a maximum credit of $7,500 for each eligible claim. 

Fuel Charge Proceeds Return to Farmers Tax Credit

The Fuel Charge Proceeds Return to Farmers Tax Credit is now accessible to self-employed farmers and individuals involved in a partnership operating a farming business with one or more permanent establishments located in Alberta, Manitoba, New Brunswick, Newfoundland and Labrador, Nova Scotia, Ontario, Prince Edward Island, or Saskatchewan. If eligible, you may be entitled to a refund of a portion of your fuel charge proceeds. 

For Individuals and Families

Canada Training Credit (CTC)

The CTC is a refundable tax credit available to help Canadians with the cost of eligible training fees.

To qualify for the CTC, you need to fill out Schedule 11 for the following:

  1. Tuition fees and other applicable fees paid to an eligible educational institution in Canada for courses taken in 2023.

  2. Fees paid to specific organizations for occupational, trade, or professional examinations undertaken in 2023.

To be eligible for the CTC, you must meet all these conditions:

  • You resided in Canada for the entire year of 2023.

  • You were at least 26 years old but less than 66 years old at the end of the year.

  • Your most recent notice of assessment or reassessment for 2022 shows a Canada Training Credit Limit for 2023.

Canada Caregiver Credit (CCC)

The CCC is a non-refundable tax credit aimed at assisting individuals who provide support to a spouse, common-law partner, or dependent with a physical or mental impairment, as outlined by the CRA.

You might be eligible for the CCC if you aid:

  • Your spouse or common-law partner dealing with a physical or mental impairment.

  • Dependents such as children, grandchildren, parents, grandparents, siblings, uncles, aunts, nieces, or nephews residing in Canada, who rely on you for consistent provision of basic needs like food, shelter, and clothing.

The amount you can claim varies depending on your relationship to the individual, your circumstances, their net income, and whether other credits are claimed for them.

Child Care Expenses

Child care expenses encompass payments made by you or someone else to arrange care for an eligible child. This care allows you to participate in income-earning activities, pursue education, or conduct research funded by a grant.

If you qualify, you can claim certain childcare expenses as deductions when you file your personal income tax return.

Disability Tax Credit (DTC)

The DTC is a non-refundable tax credit designed to support individuals with disabilities, or their family members who provide support, by reducing their income tax responsibilities.

To be eligible for this credit, individuals must have a significant and enduring impairment. Once approved, they can apply the credit when filing their taxes.

The DTC aims to ease some of the extra costs linked with the disability by lessening the individual’s income tax burden.

Moving

You can claim moving expenses you paid during the year if you meet these conditions

  • You moved to a new residence for work reasons, to start a business in a different area, or to attend a post-secondary program as a full-time student at a university, college, or other educational institution.

  • Your new residence must be at least 40 kilometres closer, determined by the shortest public route, to your new work location or educational institution.

Interest Paid on Student Loans

You might qualify to claim an amount for the interest paid on your student loan for post-secondary education if it was obtained under the following acts:

  • Canada Student Loans Act

  • Canada Student Financial Assistance Act

  • Apprentice Loans Act

  • Provincial or territorial government laws that are similar to the aforementioned acts.

Only you, or a person related to you, can claim the interest paid on the loan within the tax year 2023 or the preceding 5 years.

Donations and Gifts

When you or your spouse/common-law partner donate to eligible institutions, you might be eligible for federal and provincial/territorial non-refundable tax credits when you file your income tax and benefit return.

Normally, you can claim a portion or the full eligible donation amount, capped at 75% of your net income for the tax year.

Seeking guidance?

Wondering if you qualify for valuable tax credits or deductions? Reach out to us – as your financial advisor, we’re here to assist you in optimizing your finances and maximizing your savings.

Source: https://www.canada.ca/en/revenue-agency/services/tax/individuals/topics/about-your-tax-return/tax-return/completing-a-tax-return/whats-new.html

Canada Training Credit: https://www.canada.ca/en/revenue-agency/services/tax/individuals/topics/about-your-tax-return/tax-return/completing-a-tax-return/deductions-credits-expenses/line-45350-canada-training-credit.html

Canada Caregiver Credit: https://www.canada.ca/en/revenue-agency/services/tax/individuals/topics/about-your-tax-return/tax-return/completing-a-tax-return/deductions-credits-expenses/canada-caregiver-amount.html

Child Care Expense: https://www.canada.ca/en/revenue-agency/services/tax/individuals/topics/about-your-tax-return/tax-return/completing-a-tax-return/deductions-credits-expenses/line-21400-child-care-expenses.html

Disability Tax Credit: https://www.canada.ca/en/revenue-agency/services/tax/individuals/segments/tax-credits-deductions-persons-disabilities/disability-tax-credit.html

Moving: https://www.canada.ca/en/revenue-agency/services/tax/individuals/topics/about-your-tax-return/tax-return/completing-a-tax-return/deductions-credits-expenses/line-21900-moving-expenses.html

Interest Paid on Student Loans: https://www.canada.ca/en/revenue-agency/services/tax/individuals/topics/about-your-tax-return/tax-return/completing-a-tax-return/deductions-credits-expenses/line-31900-interest-paid-on-your-student-loans.html

Donations and Gifts: https://www.canada.ca/en/revenue-agency/services/tax/individuals/topics/about-your-tax-return/tax-return/completing-a-tax-return/deductions-credits-expenses/line-34900-donations-gifts.html

Ontario’s 2024 Budget Highlights

On March 26, 2024, the Ontario Minister of Finance announced the province’s 2024 budget. This article highlights the most important things you need to know about this budget, broken into 2 sections:

  • Personal Tax Changes

  • Business Tax Changes


Personal tax changes

There are no changes to the province’s personal tax rates in Budget 2024. 

As a result, Ontario’s personal income tax rate remains as follows: 

Gasoline tax and fuel tax

The Ontario government has chosen to extend the reduced tax rates on gasoline and fuel. This means that the tax you pay when you buy gas or fuel will remain at nine cents per litre until December 31, 2024, instead of ending on June 30, 2024.


Alcohol taxation and fees

The budget reveals that the government plans to review the taxes and fees on beer, wine, and alcoholic beverages.


Property assessment and taxation review

The budget says that Ontario will keep postponing property reassessments while it looks at how property assessments and taxes work. Ontario also plans to talk to different groups about property assessments starting in the early spring.


Housing supply and affordability

The budget says Ontario wants to make it easier for certain cities to:

  • Bring in a Vacant Home Tax

  • Give lower property taxes on new apartment buildings with many units for rent.


Technical amendments

The budget mentions that Ontario might suggest some small changes, like fixing how small estates are handled in the Estate Administration Tax Act of 1998 and adjusting how loans are dealt with during the day in Ontario.


Carbon tax referendum

The budget states that the provincial government plans to introduce a law that would ask the public to vote in a referendum before starting any new provincial carbon pricing program.


Tax system review

The budget states that the government is still looking at how taxes work in the province, which they started doing in the 2023 Ontario budget. 


Business tax changes

There are no changes to the province’s corporate tax rates in Budget 2024. 

As a result, Ontario’s Corporate income tax rate remains as follows:

1 On first $500,000 of active business income.

Ontario computer animation and special effects tax credit

The budget is making changes to who can get the Ontario Computer Animation and Special Effects (OCASE) Tax Credit. Now, for each movie or TV show, a company must spend at least $25,000 on Ontario workers’ wages, with certain timing rules. Also, instructional videos, music videos, and gaming videos won’t count for the credit anymore.

These updated eligibility criteria replace the previous requirement for an eligible film or television production to also be certified for either the Ontario Film and Television Tax Credit or the Ontario Production Services Tax Credit.

The changes start for productions that begin computer animation or special effects work on or after March 26, 2024. 

We can help!

Wondering how this year’s budget will impact your finances or your business? We can help – give us a call today!  

Source: https://budget.ontario.ca/2024/index.html

Alberta’s 2024 Budget Highlights

On February 29, 2024, the Alberta Minister of Finance announced the province’s 2024 budget. This article highlights the most important things you need to know about this budget, broken into 2 sections:

  • Personal Tax Changes

  • Business Tax Changes

Personal tax changes

There are no changes to the province’s personal tax rates in Budget 2024. 

As a result, Alberta’s personal income tax rate remains as follows: 

The budget outlines Alberta’s commitment to fulfill its election promise of introducing a new personal income tax bracket of 8% on the first $60,000 of income. This implementation is projected to occur gradually over the years 2026 and 2027. However, it is contingent upon the province maintaining sufficient fiscal capacity and achieving a balanced budget.

Alberta is Calling Attraction Bonus:

The budget unveils the Alberta is Calling Attraction Bonus, a one-time $5,000 refundable tax credit designed for individuals relocating to Alberta and working in specific occupations after the program’s launch in April 2024. To qualify for the credit, individuals must be employed full-time in one of the designated occupations, file their 2024 taxes in Alberta, and reside in the province for a minimum of 12 months, among other criteria. Alberta plans to release further details regarding the application procedure and additional eligibility requirements in the coming days.

Electric vehicles tax:

The budget unveils a new measure, imposing a $200 yearly tax on electric vehicles, slated to take effect on January 1, 2025. Alberta specifies that this levy, exempting hybrid vehicles, will be collected during vehicle registration and will supplement the current registration fee. Further information regarding this tax will be disclosed by Alberta upon the introduction of legislation to enact this measure in fall 2024.

Education Property Tax:

Education property tax rates remain unchanged in the budget, with mill rates frozen at the following levels:

  • Residential/farmland: $2.56 per $1,000 of equalized assessment

  • Non-residential: $3.76 per $1,000 of equalized assessment

Business tax changes

There are no changes to the province’s personal or corporate tax rates in Budget 2024. 

As a result, Alberta’s Corporate income tax rate remains as follows: 

We can help!

Wondering how this year’s budget will impact your finances or your business? We can help – give us a call today!  

Source: https://www.alberta.ca/budget

2024 Financial Calendar

2024 Financial Calendar

Welcome to our 2024 financial calendar! This calendar is designed to help you keep track of important financial dates and deadlines, such as tax filing and government benefit distribution. You can bookmark this page for easy reference or add these dates to your personal calendar to ensure you don’t miss any important financial obligations.

If you need help with your taxes, tax packages will be available starting February 2024. Don’t wait until the last minute to get started on your tax return – make an appointment with your accountant to ensure you’re ready to go when tax season arrives.

Important 2024 Dates to Know

On January 1, 2024 the contribution room for your Tax Free Savings Account opens again. The maximum contribution for 2024 is $7,000.

If you qualify, on January 1, 2024 the contribution room for your First Home Savings Account opens. The maximum contribution for 2024 is $8,000. 

For your Registered Retirement Savings Plan contributions to be eligible for the 2023 tax year, you must make them by February 29, 2024.

GST/HST credit payments will be issued on:  

  • January 5

  • April 5

  • July 5

  • October 4

Canada Child Benefit payments will be issued on the following dates: 

  • January 19

  • February 20

  • March 20

  • April 19

  • May 17

  • June 20

  • July 19

  • August 20

  • September 20

  • October 18

  • November 20

  • December 13

The government will issue Canada Pension Plan and Old Age Security payments on the following dates: 

  • January 29

  • February 27

  • March 26

  • April 26

  • May 29

  • June 26

  • July 29

  • August 28

  • September 25

  • October 29

  • November 27

  • December 20

The Bank of Canada will make interest rate announcements on:

  • January 24

  • March 6

  • April 10

  • June 5

  • July 24

  • September 4

  • October 23

  • December 11

April 30, 2024 is the last day to file your personal income taxes, and tax payments are due by this date. This is also the filing deadline for final returns if death occurred between January 1 and October 31, 2023.

May 1 to June 30, 2024 would be the filing deadline for final tax returns if death occurred between November 1 and December 31, 2023. The due date for the final return is six months after the date of death.

The tax deadline for all self-employment returns is June 17, 2024. Payments are due April 30, 2024. 

The final Tax-Free Savings Account, First Home Savings Account, Registered Education Savings Plan and Registered Disability Savings Plan contributions deadline is December 31.

December 31 is also the deadline for 2024 charitable contributions.

December 31 is also the deadline for individuals who turned 71 in 2024 to finish contributing to their RRSPs and convert them into RRIFs.

Please reach out if you have any questions.